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12 9月 2018 - 10:25:21

Asus k52jb Battery all-laptopbattery.com


If you want an Android iPad then this is what you buy. With a 9.7-inch, 2048 x 1536 IPS LCD screen, the 97 Titanium matches the iPad 4 pixel for pixel, inch for inch. And thanks to the 1.6GHz dual-core CPU with Mali 400 graphics and 1GB of Ram, it doesn’t perform all that differently either. There’s only 8GB of storage but there is a MicroSD slot to fix that particular failing, and the OS is reasonably up to date: Jelly Bean 4.1 in near enough stock form. The 5Mp main camera is a bit weak but the 2Mp webcam is well up to snuff.If music and video are your thing, the Archos’ media players will play just about everything out of the box, from Flac to 1080p MKV. Naturally for £230 certain sacrifices have been made. The screen, though sharp and colourful, lacks the iPad’s oleophobic coating so fingerprints show up badly. The entire device has a rather built-to-a-price feel to it. But of course it has been built to a price, so what do you expect? Credit where it’s due, it’s thinner than Apple’s baby but only 18g heavier. All in all, not a bad effort.



Age has not withered Asus’ HD Android tablet one iota. Nearly a year on and it’s still the best dockable ‘droid tablet on the market, though it’s not cheap. The 64GB version with the dock will punch a man-sized hole in £600. Still, at least for your money you are getting something that looks and feels like a genuinely high-end device. And the GPS works properly, which was something you couldn’t always say of Asus’s Transformer Prime tablet. If fondleslab snappery is your wont, the 8Mp camera is a cracker =- one of the best fitted to any current tablet, in fact.Not only does the IPS LCD screen boast a resolution of 1920 x 1200 so you get the full 1080p banana even when the menu bar is showing along the bottom, but when wound up to 11 it radiates 600cd/m2 of brightness which is enough to make the fluid in your eyeballs boil. The 1.6GHz quad-core Nvidia Tegra 3 at the heart of the beast provides a perfectly fluid user experience, and Asus has been reasonably prompt with updates from the launch Ice Cream Sandwich to Jelly Bean 4.1. I’d bet 4.2 isn’t far around the corner.



The Haifa team also produced the Intel Mobile 855 Express chipset family to support Banias with memory control and I/O logic, with USB 2.0 support and the ability to manage up to 2GB of 266MHz DDR among its features. Two forms of the chipset would debut with Centrino: the 855PM and the 855GM, the latter with Intel’s Extreme Graphics 2 core on board.The third component was the Wi-Fi adaptor card. Intel executives had already noted the arrival of Wi-Fi, the wireless networking technology based on the 1999-ratified IEEE 802.11b standard, itself derived from work by NCR and AT&T and released under the WaveLAN brand. By 2003, Wi-Fi was becoming more widespread, albeit slowly, thanks to its use of unlicensed spectrum in the 2.4GHz band. During the early part of the decade, early adopters were kitting out homes and offices with Wi-Fi base-stations. On the back of broadband connections, enterprising businesses were offering free or cheap internet access to the public in order to encourage visitors to their shops and sites.




Apple was one of the first notebook makers to embrace Wi-Fi, though it initially pitched its 802.11 support with a brand of its own, AirPort. It launched its first AirPort devices in the summer of 1999: an add-in adaptor for the iBook laptop and a base-station to feed it. By 2003, the adaptor was being offered as an option for all of Apple’s laptops and desktops, and would some become part of each machine’s standard build. Early that year, Apple upgraded AirPort to the recently approved 802.11g standard, which upped the theoretical peak throughput from 802.11b’s 11Mbps to 54Mbps.Apple’s engineers were quicker than Intel’s - or rather the third-party suppliers of its Wi-Fi adaptor cards were. Intel’s first Wi-Fi mini-PCI board, codenamed Calexico, but brought to market as the Intel PRO/Wireless 2100, was an 802.11b offering. Centrino would get plenty of stick in the early days for lacking this leading edge feature.Intel paved the way for Centrino first by briefing journalists and developers during its Intel Developer Forum conference at the end of February 2003. An ad campaign, ‘Unwire’, followed on 3 March 2003. It was devised by New York agency Euro RSCG MVBMS, now called Havas Worldwide.



“Centrino mobile technology is designed to enable wireless capabilities in smaller, lightweight PCs and make them truly mobile,” said Pam Pollace, then vice president and director of Intel's Corporate Marketing Group. “To help illustrate the freedom and flexibility that Centrino mobile technology brings, the ‘Unwire’ ad campaign humorously depicts people moving their work to surprising and unusual locations.”The ads presented businesspeople computing from their desks in unexpected places - such as a diving board, an airport ‘people mover’, a golf course driving range and an open-air sightseeing bus - surrounded by crowds unaware of the odd presence of a desk un-tethered from its office. Each concluded with the pledge: “On March 12, Intel will not only change how you work, but where you work.”Come the 12th, and Intel’s then CEO, Craig Barrett, took the wraps off Centrino. The launch, he said, heralded a new way of working for computer users, “allowing them to communicate, be productive or be entertained wherever and whenever they want.




“Our focus on integrating all the elements of mobility allows Intel Centrino mobile technology to deliver an outstanding wireless computing experience and marks the first time we’ve put a combination of technologies under a single brand. This breakthrough innovation, together with industry-wide investment and Wi-Fi hotspot deployments, brings new computing and communications capabilities to businesses and consumers, adding value to mobile PCs.”Not only the components but systems based upon them were ready to buy at the time of Centrino’s launch. “Intel Centrino mobile technology-based notebook PCs are available immediately from leading computer makers worldwide,” the chip maker said. “System pricing will start as low as $1399, comparable to today's mainstream notebooks.”Buying a Centrino laptop was easy. So was getting a base-station for the home or office. Getting online when out and about was rather harder back then. To help changed that, Intel said it would provide a list of Centrino-compatible public wireless hotspots - reckoned back then to be moving toward a world total of 118,000 by 2005, according to market watcher IDC.



Uniquely among tablet makers, Asus has hedged its bets and gone with both forms of Windows 8, using RT for the 10.1-inch VivoTab RT and full Windows 8 for the 10.1-inch VivoTab Smart and 11.6-inch VivoTab. Externally the VivoTab Smart is spiritually akin to Microsoft’s Surface, with a magnetic keyboard that talks to the tablet over Bluetooth and no secondary battery. Running Windows 8 proper on an Intel dual-core 1.8GHz Atom Z2760 CPU with 2GB of Ram, the Smart ought to to be a bit of a sluggard but that’s not the case: it runs surprisingly smoothly.The keyboard and cover-cum-stand will set you back £90 but both are rather clever and well worth having. The keyboard is light and thin but still very pleasant to type on, while the cover part can be folded up origami-style to work as a stand. The screen’s resolution is the standard 10.1-inch Windows 1368 x 766 but being an LCD IPS panel it’s brighter and rather more colourful than the norm. In fact, it looks and behaves much like the screen used in the Android Transformer Tablet and Prime, which is no bad thing. A 64GB SSD and 8MP main camera are the cherries on the cake.



Granted, the Nook HD+ is more an e-reader from the planet Krypton than a tablet but anything with a 9-inch, 1920 x 1280 screen, 16GB of storage and a price tag that’s less than £230 has to be worth a closer look. And if you plan on using your tablet mainly for reading it’s worth keeping in mind that, at 515g, the Nook HD+ is the lightest tablet here by some margin. With a UI based on a heavily skinned version of Android Ice Cream Sandwich, the HD+ is idiot proof to use and for my money a more pleasent device to spend time with than its arch enemy, the Kindle Fire HD 8.9. Not that we Brits can actually buy the Fire HD 8.9 at the moment.There’s no doubt that videos, whether streamed from the Nook store or using Netflix, look good on the HD+’s 256dpi screen though the sound is a bit tinny at higher volumes. When UltraViolet becomes more common, the tablet’s built-in support for the online movie locker system will be handy too. The absence of a webcam seems a strange decision though when many folk want to make Skype video calls on their slab. Like Kindle’s tablet offerings, you only get the apps Nook wants you to have rather than the whole Android smash, but most of the non-Google apps you are likely to want are present and correct.


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